Great Art - Giovanni Battista Tiepolo


GIOVANNI BATTISTA TIEPOLO

Giovanni Battista Tiepolo (March 5, 1696 – March 27, 1770), also known as Gianbattista or Giambattista Tiepolo.
He was prolific, and worked not only in Italy, but also in Germany and Spain.
Giovanni Battista Tiepolo, together with Giambattista Pittoni, Canaletto, Giovan Battista Piazzetta, Giuseppe Maria Crespi and Francesco Guardi forms the traditional great Old Masters of that period.
He was Europe's most outstanding exponent of the Rococo, and was, perhaps, the supreme fresco painter of the eighteenth century, and a master of ceiling illusionism.
His work represents the fulfillment of all the vivacious, decorative tendencies in the Venetian tradition.
Tiepolo's technique was the logical extension of Titian's fascination with rich fabrics and Tintoretto's fluid brushwork.
Compared to Boucher, he relied on the dynamics of the human figure more than ornamental shrubs and garden furniture.
Tiepolo could paint some very gaseous cloud effects, but he was mainly a figurative designer.
His people remind us of singers in an opera by Mozart, indeed, Tiepolo's saints and madonnas may have established the model of deportment that grand opera sopranos follow to this day.
So Tiepolo covered the palace ceilings of German princes and archbishops with angels and saints and heavenly vistas.
Although there are many Baroque elements in Tiepolo's work, he is, as we have said, the undisputed master of the Rococo tradition in decorative art.
Rococo, (less commonly roccoco, or 'Late Baroque'), is an 18th-century artistic movement and style, affecting many aspects of the arts including painting, sculpture, architecture, interior design, decoration, literature, music, and theatre.
It developed in the early 18th century in Paris, France as a reaction against the grandeur, symmetry, and strict regulations of the Baroque, especially of the Palace of Versailles.
Rococo artists and architects used a more light-hearted, florid, and graceful approach to the Baroque.
Their style was ornate and used light colors, asymmetrical designs, curves, and gold. Unlike the political Baroque, the Rococo had playful and witty themes.
The interior decoration of Rococo rooms was designed as a total work of art, with elegant and ornate furniture, small sculptures, ornamental mirrors, and tapestry complementing architecture, reliefs, and wall paintings.
The Rococo was also important in theater.
No other culture has produced a wittier, more elegant, and teasing dialogue full of elusive and camouflaging language and gestures, refined feelings and subtle criticism than Rococo theatre, especially that of France.
By the end of the 18th century, Rococo was largely replaced by the Neoclassic style.


MYTHOLOGY & ALLEGORY


The Horses of Apollo
(detail)
Giovanni Battista Tiepolo



Apollo with Frederick Barbarossa and Beatrix of Burgundy
1753

Giovanni Battista Tiepolo

The word Rococo is seen as a combination of the French rocaille (stone) and coquilles (shell), due to reliance on these objects as decorative motifs.
The term may also be a combination of the Italian word "barocco" (an irregularly shaped pearl, possibly the source of the word "baroque"), and the French "rocaille" (a popular form of garden or interior ornamentation, using shells and pebbles), and may describe the refined and fanciful style that became fashionable in parts of Europe in the 18th century.
Owing to Rococo love of shell-like curves and focus on decorative arts, some critics used the term to derogatively imply that the style was frivolous or merely modish.




 Apollo and the Continents
Wurzberg
Giovanni Battista Tiepolo



The Chariot of Aurora
Giovanni Battista Tiepolo



 Triumph of Zephyr and Flora
Giovanni Battista Tiepolo




  Triumph of Virtue and Nobility
Giovanni Battista Tiepolo




 Allegory of Venus and Time
Giovanni Battista Tiepolo




The Chariot of Aurora
Giovanni Battista Tiepolo





The Triumph of Flora
Giovanni Battista Tiepolo



 Apollo and Daphne
Giovanni Battista Tiepolo




 Apollo and Daphne
Giovanni Battista Tiepolo


HISTORY PAINTING




'The Greeks Building the Trojan Horse'
Giovanni Battista Tiepolo



Scipio Africanus Freeing Massiva 
Giovanni Battista Tiepolo


RELIGIOUS ART



The Immaculate Conception
Giovanni Battista Tiepolo



The Virgin Appearing to Dominican Saints
(detail)
Giovanni Battista Tiepolo




Vision of the Trinity

Giovanni Battista Tiepolo




Crucifixion

Giovanni Battista Tiepolo



Tiepolo died in Madrid on March 27, 1770.
After his death, the rise of Neoclassicism, and the post-revolutionary decline of absolutism, led to the slow decline of the style associated with his name, but failed to dent his reputation.








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